Calmeyer Lawyer 1s

Hans Calmeyer Righteous Gentile 1903-1972

“Dutch Schindler”

 Lawyer for Life

Caliphate

WHY  SAVE  LIVES ? 

caliphate s

Rise Of the Caliphate - Founded in 750 C.E. when the  family of Abbas revolted against the Umayyad caliphate in Khurasan. The  Abbas family were descendants of the uncle Abu al-Abbas of Muhammad. In 755 AD, the capital of  the Muslim world was changed from Damascus to the city of Baghdad. A further power center of the Caliphate developed in Spain, at Cordoba, the furthest penetration of the Christian West to date. Returning to the Caliphate is Arab expectation.

Fall Of the Caliphate - In the 1030's the Seljuk Turks (Turks already having a negative and  ferocious reputation) came to rule over a major part of the Abbasid  Caliphate with their kingdom created by Tughril Beg. The cities lessened in size because of lesser taxes. Countrysides, agricultural land, and  irrigation fell under poor maintenance. Old Baghdad had crumbled to  ruins from lack of repairs from floods, fires, and disorder. The overall population fell and the center of the Muslim world was never the same  powerful, cultural nucleus. Then in the late 11th century that Crusades  attacked the Holy Land, weakening the Caliphate even more. In the middle of the 1200's the Mongols started to invade Baghdad and defeated it in  1258. The Mongol Empire lasted only until the mid 14th Century, but a unified Caliphate never returned.

What followed the Mongols was the Ottoman Empire, with Osman 1 in 1299, taking power in Istanbul in 1590 after defeating the Byzantine Empire in Constantinople. True power ended in 1908, but Turkey has been at the center of Arab Unity for much of the past, and will likely be so again very soon (see also Erdogan).

The current mideast tensions regarding the presence of the Jews are in part the result of the vaccum left by the fall of the Ottoman Empire and the end of the Caliphate. It is important to note that much of the land in Israel was before 1948 legitimately sold to Jewish settlers by Turkey, whose Ottoman Empire dominated this largely fallow and undesired land at the time. There was no “Palestine” that was the residential land of any “Palestinians” at the time, only nomadic Arab workers and not many of those, as the land was not arable without a great deal of investment.

Today, Turkey is turning from a tolerant, secular-directed friend, and a happy supplier of energy and other goods to Israel, into a Muslim-dominated country that wants to take a lead in the Arab world alongside Iran, meaning anti-Israel. The contrived Gaza blockade-confrontation resulted in deaths of militants that are being used by Turkey and other nations to embarrass Israel and paint Israel as the aggressor. The contrived propaganda reminds us of the contrivances of the Nazis: use any opportunity to further enflame the populace against Jews generally. Like Jihad, the goal is elimination of the entire Jewish population in the area.

Joshua Teitelbaum - guardian.co.uk, Tuesday 8 June 2010 13.30 BST

Support for Turkey is at an all-time high in the Arab world. The last time Turkish flags were carried through the streets of Middle Eastern  capitals was during the first world war, as people took to the streets  in continued support for the Ottoman sultan-caliph against the western entente  powers. The sultan-caliph had proclaimed a jihad. Thanks to Turkish  government support of a blockade-running mission led by a group of Hamas sympathisers, they are flying once again. No ruling Arab leader is as  popular as the Turkish prime minister, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, whose  discourse amounts to calls for a jihad against Israel.

Israel's  relations with Ankara military, economic, and tourist (Israelis once  flocked to Turkey) have been sacrificed on the altar of Turkey's  retrograde aspiration to lead the Islamic world and establish itself  along with Iran as an alternative to American power. Turkey is once  again turning eastwards.

The Erdogan government's outrageous  provocation of Israel could have been prevented. Israel begged the Turkish government not to let the Mava Marmaris depart with its meagre  cargo of humanitarian aid (meagre compared to the aid Israel facilitates every day) and Islamist extremists armed to the teeth with clubs, wrist rockets  that fire deadly projectiles, switchblades and military-style night  vision equipment.

The provocation is all the more shameful since the Turkish government has proclaimed that all passengers were checked  thoroughly. Is this the behaviour of a friendly country? Of the six  ships, only the Turkish ship resisted violently; all the others were  boarded without incident.

But the gall of Erdogan and his foreign  minister Ahmet Davutoglu knows no bounds. Erdogan's bellicose  exhortations were beyond belief. "The heart of humanity has taken one of her heaviest wounds in history," he cried. "Bloody massacre"  "spilling the blood of innocent humans" "in the history of humanity  this has been recorded as a major shame" "a despicably cowardly and  vicious act." Turkey, unlike Israel, bellowed Erdogan, is not an  "adolescent, rootless state". "As precious as Turkey's partnership is,  so harsh will be her hostility." He concluded, no less: "Today is a  turning point in history. Nothing will ever be the same again."

While Erdogan was engaged in war-mongering, Davutoglu was urging the  west to drop sanctions against Iran. He next expressed his  "disappointment" that the US had not condemned the Israeli raid, which  he termed "murder conducted by a state". (In contrast, the sinking of a South Korean ship in May by North Korea, killing 46 sailors,  was of "great concern" to the Turkish foreign ministry.)

It is  difficult to imagine that Turkey would be engaging in this kind of  behaviour were the US demonstrating world leadership and not abandoning  the field to the likes of Erdogan. While the administration works to  assure Israel's security with co-operation on missile defence, it has  yet emboldened Israel's enemies by publicly pressuring Jerusalem at  every turn, not taking decisive action against Iran, and caving to Egypt by singling out Israel – to the exclusion of Iran – at the nuclear non-proliferation treaty review conference last month.  Post-conference palliatives offered up by US officials did little to  ameliorate the impression in the region that the US was hanging Israel  out to dry. Turkey was simply bandwagoning.

Israel will now be  closely examining its relationship with Turkey. Turkish Jews are afraid  to leave their homes. Israel has withdrawn the families of its diplomats out of fear for their safety. Israel has excellent relations with the  armed forces of Turkey, but they have had their wings clipped by the  massive assault against them in the murky episode known as Ergenekon, in which several military officers and others are accused of trying to overthrow Erdogan's party.

Turkey's over-the-top behaviour has Israelis scratching their heads. How would  Ankara react, for instance, if Israeli "humanitarian organisations"  decided to run aid missions to the terrorist PKK, the Kurdish separatist group in Turkey? Do the Turks really want an Iranian port on the  Mediterranean in Gaza? And for that matter, do the western countries,  which have so roundly castigated Israel?

There may be an  international commission of inquiry into the incident. An unbiased  commission must certainly also examine the possible complicity of the Turkish authorities in arming the militants.

There is still hope  for Turkey. While old-style Kemalism probably needs to be revamped, the  person to do it just might be Kemal Kilicdaroglu, the newly  elected head of the Republican People's party (CHP). As the Washington  Institute's Soner Cagaptay notes in  the Jerusalem Post, he could bring about a "New Kemalism Kemalism  2.0 [which] would be updated and recast to preserve the liberal  aspects of a Kemalist polity, while jettisoning authoritarianism and  anachronistic aspects of traditional Kemalism."

Spurned by the EU, where it has applied for membership and ruled by an Islamist party with delusions of grandeur, Turkey is determined to lead the Muslim world  once more and is promoting a clash of civilisations in order to compete  strategically with the US. Turkey is no longer a friend, but not yet an  enemy of the US. It is a "frenemy," writes Steven Cook of the Council on Foreign Relations. Let's hope that Ankara's Islamist rulers pull back from the brink represented by its  risky and irresponsible policies.While Erdogan was engaged in war-mongering, Davutoglu was urging the  west to drop sanctions against Iran. He next expressed his  "disappointment" that the US had not condemned the Israeli raid, which  he termed "murder conducted by a state". (In contrast, the sinking of a South Korean ship in May by North Korea, killing 46 sailors,  was of "great concern" to the Turkish foreign ministry.)

It is  difficult to imagine that Turkey would be engaging in this kind of  behaviour were the US demonstrating world leadership and not abandoning  the field to the likes of Erdogan. While the administration works to  assure Israel's security with co-operation on missile defence, it has  yet emboldened Israel's enemies by publicly pressuring Jerusalem at  every turn, not taking decisive action against Iran, and caving to Egypt by singling out Israel – to the exclusion of Iran – at the nuclear non-proliferation treaty review conference last month.  Post-conference palliatives offered up by US officials did little to  ameliorate the impression in the region that the US was hanging Israel  out to dry. Turkey was simply bandwagoning.

Israel will now be  closely examining its relationship with Turkey. Turkish Jews are afraid  to leave their homes. Israel has withdrawn the families of its diplomats out of fear for their safety. Israel has excellent relations with the  armed forces of Turkey, but they have had their wings clipped by the  massive assault against them in the murky episode known as Ergenekon, in which several military officers and others are accused of trying to overthrow Erdogan's party.

Turkey's over-the-top behaviour has Israelis scratching their heads. How would  Ankara react, for instance, if Israeli "humanitarian organisations"  decided to run aid missions to the terrorist PKK, the Kurdish separatist group in Turkey? Do the Turks really want an Iranian port on the  Mediterranean in Gaza? And for that matter, do the western countries,  which have so roundly castigated Israel?

There may be an  international commission of inquiry into the incident. An unbiased  commission must certainly also examine the possible complicity of the  Turkish authorities in arming the militants.

There is still hope  for Turkey. While old-style Kemalism probably needs to be revamped, the  person to do it just might be Kemal Kilicdaroglu, the newly  elected head of the Republican People's party (CHP). As the Washington  Institute's Soner Cagaptay notes in  the Jerusalem Post, he could bring about a "New Kemalism – Kemalism  2.0 – [which] would be updated and recast to preserve the liberal  aspects of a Kemalist polity, while jettisoning authoritarianism and  anachronistic aspects of traditional Kemalism."

Spurned by the EU, where it has applied for membership and ruled by an Islamist party with delusions of grandeur, Turkey is determined to lead the Muslim world  once more and is promoting a clash of civilisations in order to compete  strategically with the US. Turkey is no longer a friend, but not yet an  enemy of the US. It is a "frenemy," writes Steven Cook of the Council on Foreign Relations. Let's hope that Ankara's Islamist rulers pull back from the brink represented by its  risky and irresponsible policies.

Disproportionate Force a Misnomer

Disproportionate€ť is a term used to condemn Israeli retaliation.  It does not apply to other, far more violent reprisals, such as the  Russian leveling of Grozny, or the Turkish killing of Kurds, or  occasional Hindu mass rioting and murdering of Muslims in India. Does  Prime Minister Erdogan wish to allow peace activists€ť to interview  Kurds detained in his prisons, or to adjudicate the status of Kurds,  Armenians, or Christian religious figures who live in Turkey? Can we  imagine a peace flotilla of Swedish and British leftists sailing to  Cyprus to deliberate Greek land or investigate the disappearance of thousands of Greeks in 1974? And if they did, what would  happen to them? About the same as would happen if they blocked a road to interdict a Turkish armored column rolling into Kurdistan.

Nor do human-rights violations mean much any more. Iran executes more of its own citizens each year than Israel has killed Palestinians  in the course of war in any given year. Syria murders whomever it  pleases in Lebanon without worry that any international body will ever  condemn its action. I have heard a great deal about the “massacre” or  “slaughter” at Jenin, where 52 Palestinians and 23 Israelis died.  Indeed, the 2002 propaganda film Jenin, Jenin was a big hit on  college campuses. But I have never seen a documentary Hama, Hama commemorating the real 1982 slaughter of somewhere between  10,000 and 40,000 civilians by the criminal Assad regime in Syria, with  which we now so eagerly wish to restore ties. I find a 1,000-to-1  fatality rule generally applies: Each person killed by the Israel  Defense Forces warrants about as much international attention as 1,000  people killed by Africans, Russians, Indians, Chinese, or Arabs.